Teacher training courses on simulation games and other interactive methods

Teaching Europe interactively

For years, the European Union has been part of the curriculum at German schools. Extensive information and teaching materials are available, and there are only few limits to exploring the subject of Europe in teaching. The EU in class – no problem?

Apparently yes. Demand for training courses about alternative methods for teaching EU-related content is high. Therefore, we provide tailor-made teacher training seminars: inside one school or for a group from various schools, as a three-hour workshop or a two-day seminar and with varying topics.

There are three modules to choose from: “Method workshop Europe” with a range of activating elements, “EU simulation games” and how to play them in class, and “Developing your own simulation game.”

All our methods are designed to a) involve the students actively and b) complement the regular curriculum while being applicable without taking up much additional time. Our training seminars usually dispense with didactic introductions and pedagogical treatises. Instead, they focus on the everyday reality of teaching and the practicability of their content.

To this end, teachers try out the methods and are given all the materials on a CD. After more than 30 such seminars all over Germany, counting between 20 and 50 participants, our methods will no doubt soon be part of the national curriculum!

Facts + Figures

Target group

Teachers at all types of schools

Objectives
  • Increase methodological competence
  • Ability to run simulation games
Client(s)

Schools, foundations, ministries, EU Commission

Duration

3 h to 2 days

Number of participants

10-50

Location(s)

Germany-wide

Language(s)

German

Competencies

Testimonials

  • I found it very helpful to get a brief insight into the theoretical background of simulation games and an introduction into what to keep in mind when designing simulations. Even better was to play two short simulations myself, one fictitious and the other one “real”. I am convinced that many educational aims as well as content can be consolidated via simulation games – not to mention the social interaction between the pupils. Thanks to this training seminar I am so convinced of this method that I have decided to use simulation games in my communication and history classes.

    Martin Wiesbauer (High School teacher in Wels, Austria)