The simulation game “Democracy lab” with apolitical young people

“Underprivileged educational background” or “Hard to Reach”?

Political education is often aimed at those who are interested, dedicated, already actively involved and well educated. Too often, we think! It is our aim to present topics and formats in such a way that those who are described as apolitical and educationally underprivileged can be reached – e.g. with a version of our simulation game “Democracy Lab.”

This simulation game is aimed at groups of pupils from lower secondary schools and special schools from the age of 13. It deals with very concrete topics that directly correspond to the participants’ everyday experience, allowing them to intuitively take a stance. The materials do away with long and complicated texts; instead, they are easily accessible through the use of illustrations and directly formulated work steps. In a playful manner, the pupils gain insight into abstract topics that would otherwise seem inaccessible, such as democracy, elections and party politics. At the same time, important competencies such as self-organising and taking responsibility, presenting work and arguments are trained.

So far, our experiences with the format have been very positive, and we will extend our programme range aimed at “Hard to reach”-groups. Therefore, we have become members of the network “Verstärker”.

However, we haven’t managed to come up with a better name for the target group yet…

Facts + Figures

Target group

Apolitical, educationally underprivileged young people (“Hard to Reach“)

Objectives
  • Understanding the basics of democracy
  • Reducing inhibitions and reservations in relation to dealing with political content
  • Raise interest in politics
  • Increase presentation and argumentation skills
Client(s)

Friedrich Ebert Foundation Bonn

Duration

1 day

Number of participants

30

Location(s)

Bonn

Language(s)

German

Competencies

Testimonials

  • For ten years now, the planpolitik team has been consistently dedicated and creative, always immediately catching the students’ imaginations.

    Dr. Stefanie Hanke, Friedrich Ebert Foundation